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AI 1.1 Amateur Radio 50 MHz Region 1

Agenda item 1.1

1.1              to consider an allocation of the frequency band 50-54 MHz to the amateur service in Region 1, in accordance with Resolution 658 (WRC-15);

Resolution 658 (WRC‑15)Allocation of the frequency band 50-54 MHz to the amateur service in Region 1

Executive summary

This agenda item addresses a possible new Region 1 allocation to the amateur service in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz by full or partial worldwide harmonisation with the existing 4 MHz primary allocations in Regions 2 and 3.

The spectrum needs for the amateur service has been quantified in two studies using an application-based approach. One of them indicates that 4 MHz of spectrum is required while the other indicates that 1.75 MHz is required.

Administrations in parts of Region 1 are party to the ST61[1] and GE89[2] Regional Agreements which remain in force in the band 50-54 MHz.

Studies have been undertaken to assess the possibility of sharing with the incumbent broadcasting, land mobile and radiolocation services. The studies have demonstrated that large separation distances are required for sharing with incumbent services. Furthermore, regulatory provisions will need to be implemented.

Four methods are provided to satisfy the agenda item including the No Change method:

–                 Method A: An allocation to the amateur service on a primary basis in Region 1 in the band 50-54 MHz, or part thereof;

–                 Method B: An allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis in Region 1 in the band 50.080-50.280 MHz, (Method B1), or in the band 50-52 MHz (Method B2);

–                 Method C: An allocation to the amateur service in Region 1 on a partly primary and partly secondary basis in all or part of the frequency band 50‑54 MHz;

–                 Method D: No changes in the frequency band 50-54 MHz.

Regulatory text is also provided for implementation of the proposed methods. Footnotes would ensure that  Amateur stations would not interfer with Broadcasting nor seek protection from it where applicable. Similarly footnotes would state that  Amateur stations would not interfere with other fixed link,  mobile  or wind-profiler radars nor seek protection from them where relevant.

The Conference of European Postal and Telecommunications  administrations (CEPT) European Common Proposal to the WRC19 proposes a variant of Method C where the Amateur Service would get a secondary allocation in 50-52MHz, with a footnote "Different Category of Service" in some ITU Region 1 Member States where the Amateur Service have a primary allocation.

Background

In ITU Region 1, the frequency band 50‑54 MHz is allocated to the broadcasting service on a primary basis, with additional or alternative allocations to the amateur, fixed, mobile, and/or radiolocation limited to wind profiler radars (WPR) services in some countries.

The frequency band 47-68 MHz in most of Region 1 is governed by the ST61 and GE89 Regional Agreements, which remain in force, noting that several countries in Region 1 were not party to the original agreements.

The frequency band 50-54 MHz is allocated to the amateur service on a primary basis in ITU Regions 2 and 3. Full or partial worldwide harmonisation of the allocation to the amateur service in the frequency band 50-54 MHz would enhance radio amateurs' global efforts to fulfil the purposes of the amateur service.  The purposes of the amateur service include self-training, technical investigations and intercommunication for a variety of purposes including communication in support of disaster relief.

The frequency bands 47-50 MHz and 54-68 MHz are allocated to broadcasting services on a primary basis in Region 3. Furthermore, the frequency band 50-54 MHz is allocated to fixed, mobile and broadcasting services on a primary basis in some countries in Region 3 based on RR footnote No. 5.167.

The 50 MHz frequency band is allocated under RR footnote No. 5.169 to the amateur service on a primary basis in some African countries already.

Methods to satisfy the agenda item

Four methods are proposed to satisfy the agenda item and all of them involve suppression of Resolution 658 (WRC-15).

Method A

An allocation to the amateur service on a primary basis in the entire band 50-54 MHz, or part thereof, with appropriate footnotes to provide protection to services which already have an allocation in the band.

Advantages:

–                 The requirement of the amateur service to have an allocation in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz in Region 1 would be partly or fully satisfied.

–                 Partial or full harmonization of spectrum throughout the three ITU regions would be achieved for the amateur service, thus the principles outlined in Recommendation 34 (Rev.WRC-12) would be respected.

Disadvantages:

–                 Administrations may need to adopt specific measures or develop multilateral agreements to ensure harmful interference is not caused to stations of incumbent services operated within their territory or in neighbouring territories.

–                 The amateur service could cause harmful interference to incumbent services, in Region 1 and its neighbouring countries in Region 3, which may be difficult to resolve.

–                Sharing with the radiolocation service may not be successful in protecting the incumbent service.

–                 May affect current and future usage of the band in Region 1 and its neighbouring countries in Region 3.

Method B1

An allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis in the 50.080-50.280 MHz frequency band, with appropriate footnotes or appropriate regulatory text to provide protection to services which already have an allocation in the band.

Advantages:

–                 The requirement of the amateur service to have an allocation in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz in Region 1 would be partly satisfied.

–                 Partial harmonisation of spectrum throughout the three RR Regions would be achieved, thus the principles outlined in Recommendation 34 (Rev.WRC-12) would be respected.

–                 Incumbent services with a primary allocation remain protected and does not place constraints on the secondary incumbent services.

Disadvantages:

–                 Full harmonisation of spectrum for the amateur service throughout the three RR Regions would not be achieved in terms of service status.

–                 If the amateur service has secondary status, future introduction of new primary services into the band or modification to RR Article 5 covering all or part of the 50-54 MHz frequency band may adversely impact the amateur service.

–                 The spectrum needs of the amateur service in the frequency band 50-54 MHz in Region 1 would not be satisfied.

Method B2

An allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis in the frequency band 50-52 MHz, with appropriate footnotes to provide protection to services which already have an allocation in the band.

Advantages:

–                 The spectrum needs of the amateur service in the frequency band 50-54 MHz in Region 1 might be satisfied .

–                 Partial harmonisation of spectrum throughout the three RR Regions would be achieved, thus the principles outlined in Recommendation 34 (Rev.WRC-12) would be respected.

–                 Incumbent services with a primary allocation remain protected and does not place constraints on the secondary incumbent services.

Disadvantages:

–                 The spectrum needs of the amateur service in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz in Region 1 might be only partly satisfied .

–                 Full harmonisation of spectrum for the amateur service throughout the three RR Regions would not be achieved in terms of service status.

–                 If the amateur service has secondary status, future introduction of new primary services into the band or modification to RR Article 5 covering all or part of the 50-54 MHz frequency band may adversely impact the amateur service.

Method C

An allocation to the amateur service on a partly primary and partly secondary basis in all or part of the frequency band 50‑54 MHz, with appropriate footnotes to provide protection to services which already have an allocation in the band.

Advantages:

–                 The requirement of the amateur service to have an allocation in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz in Region 1 would be fully or partially satisfied.

–                 Partial harmonisation of spectrum throughout the three ITU regions would be achieved, thus the principles outlined in Recommendation 34 (Rev.WRC-12) would be fully or partially respected.

–                 The use of RR No. 4.4 for implementing spectrum allocations on a national or multinational basis may be avoided.

Disadvantages:

–                 The needs of the amateur service in the frequency band 50‑54 MHz in Region 1 for spectrum and spectrum harmonization may only be partly satisfied.

–                 Administrations in Region 1 and its neighbouring countries in Region 3 may need to adopt specific measures, or develop multilateral agreements to ensure harmful interference is not caused to stations of incumbent services (which may be difficult to resolve) operating within their territory or in neighbouring territories.

–                 Sharing with the radiolocation service may not be successful in protecting the incumbent service.

–                 May affect current and future usage of the band in Region 1 and its neighbouring countries in Region 3.

Method D

Method D proposes No Change in the frequency band 50-54 MHz.

Advantage:

–                 Avoid additional restrictions on the operations of broadcasting, radiolocation, land mobile and fixed services stations and avoid possible interference from the amateur service.

Disadvantage:

–                 Does not satisfy the requirements of the amateur service.



 

[1]   Final Acts of the European Broadcasting Conference (Stockholm, 1961 as revised in Geneva, 2006) ("ST61") in the European Broadcasting Area.

[2]   Final Acts of the African Broadcasting Conference (Geneva, 1989 as revised in Geneva, 2006) ("GE89") in the African Broadcasting Area and neighbouring countries.